Today is Sunday, April 19, 2015
Displaying Articles 1 - 25 of 40
Prev - Next
The strings are all too visible behind ''Gatsby'

By PATRICK HALL
Special toThe Wilson Post

Let me preface by saying I considerThe Great Gatsbyto be one of the greatest American novels ever written, and I never expected Baz Luhrmanns film to live up to that standard.

With that being said, Luhrmann definitely gets it, and his film is a decent adaptation, depicting Gatsbys world vividly, but tries too hard to include modernity within a facade of green screens and vibrant colors.

In case you arent aware, The Great Gatsby is the story of elusive Long Island millionaire Jay Gatsby (Leonardo DiCaprio) and his neighbor, bond salesman Nick Carraway (Tobey MaGuire).

The two meet up at one of Gatsbys illustrious parties and Gatsby persuades Carraway to set up a meet with Carraways cousin Daisy (Carey Mulligan), whom was in love with Gatsby just five years prior.

The story is all opulence, parties and the attempts of one man to regain a love he once had, through the material world. Lurhmanns vision is bright and the film runs with a breakneck pace that is exhausting for the first hour.

Lurhmann seems to pound the roaring part of the Roaring 20s into the audience, with sensory overload. That overload is also a message about the decades overflowing wealth, alcohol and possessions.

Read more...
Lincoln to lead Academy Award winners Sunday

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

The 85th Academy Awards will be held on Sunday, and while I spent quite some time mulling over the most deserving films, I am settling on the fact that Lincoln will be the winner in the big categories, despite the fact that I dont see it as the best of the nominees.

Directed by Steven Spielberg, and based on a book by Doris Kearns Goodwin, Lincoln received rave reviews, most notably for the otherworldly performance by Daniel Day-Lewis as President Abraham Lincoln.

The film was truly outstanding and a wonderful look into one of our greatest Presidents, as well as the political fight over the death of slavery. It is nominated for a whopping 12 awards: Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress, Cinematography, Costume Design, Best Directing, Film Editing, Original Score, Production Design, Sound Mixing and Best Adapted Screenplay.

All things considered, Im guessing Lincoln wins four awards, including Best Picture, Best Actor for Day-Lewis and Best Director for Spielberg and Best Supporting Actress for Sally Field, as Mary Todd Lincoln.

To me, Lincoln was mind-blowingly good upon first seeing it. Day-Lewiss performance as the embattled and depressed, but resolute President was transcendent. With subtly of movements and facial expressions alongside moments of power and charisma, in "Lincoln",Day-Lewis continued to make his case as one of the best actors to ever step in front of a camera.

Read more...
'Silver Linings' is beautifully honest

By PATRICK HALL
Special toThe Wilson Post

Best Picture nominee Silver Linings Playbook is a genuine and emotional look into the lives of two individuals, mostly described as crazy, but the truth is, the film succeeds in pulling back the curtain on all our lives and the truth that we all have flaws and depend on those around us to love, forgive and accept our particular brand of crazy.

Pat (Bradley Cooper) is bipolar, and in a psychiatric hospital thanks to him nearly beating a man to death when he found his wife having an affair. But really, whats the big deal? After all, his father, Pat, Sr. (Robert De Niro) is banned from Philadelphia Eagles football games for fighting too many people in the stands.

But at home, Pat struggles to accept his condition and overcome it, with the help of his family and an unlikely companion, Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence). Shes not without her own emotional baggage. Tiffanys husband, a police officer, was killed, and she was fired from her job for sleeping with everyone in the office.

Pat has no filter when speaking. Tiffany is angry, lonely and struggling to cope with her life. Together, Cooper and Lawrence are fascinating and mix together in a beautiful play of emotional tension, hilarious outbursts and heartbreaking struggles.

Read more...
'Beasts' a beautiful tale of courage and love

By PATRICK HALL
Special toThe Wilson Post

Captivating and beautiful, while also at times, littered with grit and destruction, Beasts of the Southern Wild is a fantastic film tribute to those who chose to stay the course and not leave their homes during Hurricane Katrina, and the performance by its lead actress is downright amazing.

Beasts is a film not many around here had the chance to see, and thankfully, it is available to rent now, but it is one of nine films up for Best Picture at the 85th Academy Awards on Feb. 24. Directed by Ben Zeitlin, the film follows little bayou resident Hushpuppy, played brilliantly, and captivatingly by Quvenzhan Wallis, as she struggles with her fathers declining health and the apparent destruction of the physical world around her.

The first thing that will jump out at you is the setting. Taking place in a tiny bayou community, the Bathtub, at the very southernmost edge of Louisianas coastline, the community is simple and its residents are content with their lives and find joy in life.

Hushpuppy lives in a run-down mobile home on stilts, connected to her fathers home by a rope and bell, which he rings when hes prepared supper. Her father, Wink (Dwight Henry) lives in a shack, almost like a tree house, and together they traverse the bayou in a boat that is an old truck bed on oil barrels with a motor attached.

Read more...
'Zero Dark Thirty' is visceral, tense, phenomenal

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

From voices crying out in terror on Sept. 11, 2001, to SEAL Team Six sifting through computer hard drives and a Central Intelligence Agency operative confirming his identity, Zero Dark Thirty is a tense, heart-pounding and thrilling look at the search for Osama bin Laden.

DirectorKathryn Bigelowsfilm opens with its disclaimer, based on first-hand accounts, and shifts to a haunting sequence of 911 calls from people inside the World Trade Center on Sept. 11. Anyone who experienced that day will immediately have the myriad of feelings theyve had over the past 10 years resurface, which is exactly what makes Zero Dark Thirty so compelling.

Cut to CIA operatives Maya (Jessica Chastain) and Dan (Jason Clarke) as they interrogate a suspected Al Qaeda agent in Pakistan. Its brutal, humiliating and in-your-face. Dan has done this all before. He wholly believes in his mission, to bring justice, his means are completely justified.

In the back of the room, Maya is tentative, its her first interrogation. She can barely watch; she struggles with Dans order to get a bucket of water for a round of water boarding.

The film follows Maya, based on a real CIA operative still undercover, who finds a small lead to the whereabouts of bin Laden, and she is 100 percent certain that lead is the best they will ever get to finding him. The film is 10 years of terrorist attacks around the world, CIA failings, lost suspects, dead ends and tragedies that culminated on May 2, 2011.

Read more...
It is no surprise Lincoln leads with 12 Oscar nominations

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

I checked out the announcement of the nominees in the 85th Academy Awards over breakfast Thursday morning and, deservedly so, Lincoln leads all films with a grand total of 12 nominations, but it faces stiff competition in several categories.

The nominations for DirectorSteven SpielbergsLincoln include: Best Motion Picture, Best Director, Best Actor in a Leading Role (Daniel Day-Lewis), Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Tommy Lee Jones), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Sally Field), Best Screenplay Based on Material Previously Produced or Published (Tony Kushner), Best Cinematography, Best Editing, Best Production Design, Best Costume Design, Best Original Score (John Williams) and Best Sound Mixing.

My kneejerk reaction has Lincoln taking home one written-in-stone lock and that is Best Actor in a Leading Role, because as great asDenzel Washingtonwas in Flight andJoaquin Phoenixwas in The Master, this award is Day-Lewis hands down, without question.

From there it really is a tight race this year.

Read more...
'Lincoln', 'Master' best films of 2012

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

There were definitely some huge hits at the theaters in 2012, and it was certainly a much better year at the movies than 2011, and looking back, Lincoln and The Master stand as the years most outstanding films.

With the Academy Awards coming up next month, nominees for categories will soon be announced and you can bet these two films will be in the running for Best Picture, but they are not without their flaws.

The Master was written and directed byPaul Thomas Anderson, who is becoming a force to be reckoned with and whose films truly speak volumes. In Master, Anderson created a tragic waltz between wayward drifter Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix) and charismatic cult leader Lancaster Dodd (Phillip Seymour Hoffman).

From its opening sequences, The Master was the only film I saw this year where the entire theater sat in complete silence until the credits rolled. It was mesmerizing, beautifully acted and filmed and something I simply couldnt take my eyes from for a second.

Read more...
Django is a fun, hilarious albeit brutal tale

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

Theres no sugar-coating anything in Quentin Tarantinos new film Django Unchained, nor should there be, and the movie is downright awesome, hilarious and so brutally honest that it is impossible to ignore when looking for the best movie of 2012.

In 1858, German bounty-hunter Dr. King Shultz (Christoph Waltz) encounters the slave Django (Jamie Foxx) and sets him free to help find three outlaws to collect the bounty. Along the way, Django and Shultz turn to freeing Djangos wife Broomhilda from the brutal Mississippi plantation owner Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio).

Right from the get-go we get no apologies from Tarantino on the manner of this revenge-film, similar to his 2009 film Inglourious Basterds. Like that film, Django is one in which the oppressed are given the chance to pay back their oppressors.

For Django it means, Kill white folks and pay you for it? Whats not to like? The film spares no expense on its brutality with the deaths of countless slavers, plantation owners, overseers and more. To be honest, it didnt bother me in the least.

Read more...
'Hobbit' slow at first, a fantastic journey

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

Despite a slow start, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is really an outstanding adventure that is likely to thrill fans of the book but presents problems for the casual moviegoer.

Directed byPeter Jackson, and based onJ.R.R. Tolkiensnovel, The Hobbit, the film is the first of three, and tells of the hobbit Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) and his journey with 13 dwarves and the wizard Gandalf (Ian McKellan).

Of course, the films opens with a prologue on how the dragon Smaug destroyed the dwarves homeland of Erebor and the surrounding region, setting up the films plot. The first 45 minutes drag on, despite the prologue showing off stunning landscapes and dwarf cities common to Middle earth.

There could have been a much more organic way to familiarize the audience with the background, especially considering the entire company of dwarves show up unannounced at Bilbos house for dinner to recruit him for the trip.

But once the journey gets underway, the film is fantastic and a whole lot of fun. In keeping with the books theme, the characters and events are light-hearted and plenty of comedy is provided by the dwarves.

Read more...
'Lord of the Rings' the greatest film trilogy of all time

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

With no major releases this past weekend, I started my anticipation for this weekends The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey by taking part in a Saturday marathon of all three Lord of the Rings films in theaters, and DirectorPeter Jacksoncant possibly outdo himself.

Of course, Saturday was the first time I had experienced the Rings films in a movie theater since I last saw the third installment, Return of the King on the big screen in 2003. It was a marvelous time, even though it took over 12 hours to watch all three (11:15 a.m. to 12:45 a.m. the next day, with 45 minutes in between the films).

This weekend, Jackson returns toJ.R.R. TolkiensMiddle-Earth for The Hobbit, which will be the first in another trilogy taking place in Tolkiens fictional world. Based on the novel, The Hobbit, Jackson and New Line Cinemas decided to draw the story out into three films.

I had hoped Jackson would just stick to a two-part story, as was originally announced, but with the addition of a third film for Hobbit, I cant help but think theres no way it can live up to what Jackson achieved with Lord of the Rings.

That trilogy is easily the greatest film trilogy of all time and over the weekend I couldnt possibly think of any other trio of films that could stand up to them, except maybeGeorge Lucassoriginal Star Wars films, if for no other reason than the cultural impact they had.

Read more...
Killing Them Softly is not subtle, not for the faint of heart

By PATRICK HALL
Special toThe Wilson Post

In rain-soaked New Orleans, Director Andrew Dominik uses the collapse of the local criminal economy as a blatant depiction of the recession in America and paints a grim, nihilistic view of the current American landscape and creates a film that will only improve with age.

Killing Them Softly tells of two criminal screw-ups, Frankie (Scoot McNairy) and Russel (Ben Mendelsohn) are chosen by Johnny Squirrel Amato (Vincent Curatola) to steal money from a mob-run poker game. After the caper, the trio runs into trouble when the mob brings in Jackie (Brad Pitt) to clean up the mess.

From a startling opening set to then-Senator Barack Obama speaking about the 2008 election, the film uses its mob-poker game to parallel the economic ruin of New Orleans following Katrina and America in the grips of recession.

Dominik abandons all subtlety as politicians are everywhere, on radio, televisions and voice-overs. The images and constant reminders of economic conditions permeate virtually every scene.

When the poker game is hit, the mob roughs up the games keeper Markie Trattman (Ray Liotta) and use him as an apparent scapegoat to return confidence in the criminal community. The references to economic confidence from speeches by then-President George W. Bush make it impossible to miss Dominiks message.

Read more...
Bond reaches new heights in Skyfall

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

Its been 50 years since British secret agent James Bond hit the screen and for the first time in the longest film series of all time, an audience knows who that man is, where he came from, and in Skyfall, the franchise maybe has reached its apex.

The third outing forDanielCraigas Bond is without a doubt his best and as a lover of every Bond film, short of a couple stinkers, Skyfall, is one of the best, right up there with Dr. No, Goldfinger, and other classics.

In Skyfall, Mi6 loses a computer hard drive that contains the identity of every agent embedded in terrorist organizations across the world. During the pursuit of the thief, Bond is shot and seemingly falls to his death.

When the devious and maniacal villain Silva (JavierBardem) uses the list and begins to personally attack Mi6 leader M (JudiDench), Bond returns and proves that he is the best at what he does, even when he has lost a step.

Read more...
Washington is brilliant as tragic pilot in Flight

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

Captain Whip Whittaker wakes up, inhales a line of cocaine, stumbles over countless bottles of liquor and beer and makes it to the airport in time to make another alcoholic beverage and fly a passenger jet to Atlanta, he also winds up saving the lives of 96 out of 102 people onboard.

Such is the life of Whittaker (Denzel Washington) in Flight, the latest film from Director Robert Zemeckis, which is absolutely one of the best of the year. The entirety of its success is built on Washington giving one of the best performances of his career.

When the plane goes down (which is obvious in the previews, if youve seen them), Whittaker is a hero for saving all but six people onboard as he miraculously crash-lands the plane in a field after a massive mechanical failure.

But when the investigation into the crash begins, Whittaker is forced to face his alcoholism and drug addiction. He hides from interviews and the public eye while they call him a hero, but the fact that his blood-alcohol level was 0.28, would land him in prison for years.

Read more...
Cloud Atlas complex, but fantastic storytelling

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

Sitting in a very empty theater, I realized that Cloud Atlas is a film thats less about conveying a singular idea or story, but rather more about the way in which the stories of six events spanning across thousands of years are relatable to one another through the human spirit.

It would be nearly impossible to convey what Atlas is about because it tells six different stories, from time periods ranging from 1850 to 2344 and everything in between. Based on the 2004 novel of the same name by David Mitchell, Atlas really is a wonderful experience, but most likely wont make very much money as its form isnt massively appealing.

Written and Directed by Lana and Andy Wachowski and Tom Tykwer, the film opens with just enough from all six stories to get hooked on each of them. It bounces from one to the other, but not in an incoherent way.

They are all stories of love, freedom, finding the truth, overcoming societys boundaries and how the actions of one individual can affect countless lives. I couldnt possibly name every member of the amazing cast, nor the characters they play.

Since the stories jump from one time period to another, every actor portrays multiple characters and sometimes those characters are of different age, race or sex than the last. Atlas really is an unbelievable feat of acting and directorial skill, as well as writing.

Read more...
Alex Cross not entirely bad, but not too good either

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

Dr. Alex Cross is a family man, an intellectual psychologist and above all, a good detective in the Detroit Police Department, but despite the role being a welcome change of pace for star Tyler Perry, the movie didnt really stand out.

Based on books by James Patterson, the film follows the titular character played by Perry as he tries to uncover some brutal murders by an unnamed sociopath played by Matthew Fox. The villain hits Cross and his partner and childhood friend, Tommy Kane (Edward Burns), close to home and the film takes a revenge-flick tone.

Unfortunately, the plot of Cross doesnt really move in any coherent direction for most of the film. The fact that nothing is known about its sociopathic villain, identified as Picasso in the end credits, or his motives is annoying and how he achieves some of his villainy is questionable.

For instance, he of course, knows the exact location and time Cross will be out to dinner with his wife. Well enough, in fact, that hes able to position himself inside a neighboring building with a high-powered rifle with perfect line-of-sight to their table, which they sit down at after Picasso finds his position.

Read more...
'Argo' not entirely true, but still a thrilling film

By PATRICK HALL
Special to The Wilson Post

Sometimes stories in films are just too crazy to believe, but in the case of the based-on-a-true-story film, Argo, the reality is more entertaining than most of what Hollywood cooks up these days, and it finally tells a miraculous story that saved the lives of six Americans.

Directed byBen Affleck, who also stars as TonyMendez, Argo tells of the Iranian Revolution in 1979, where the U.S. Embassy in Tehran was stormed and 52 Americans taken hostage. But there were six who escaped the embassy to the Canadian Ambassadors home.

Mendez devises a plan to get the six embassy personnel home, by disguising as a Canadian film producer and the six Americans as his crew on a location scout in Tehran. It was, asBryan CranstonsJack ODonnell put it, The best bad idea we have.

Argo finds a balance between tension, humor and the heavily emotional events to create a narrative that is deadly serious, but breaks tension in key moments with witty humor. However, not all of its best moments actually happened.

Read more...
'Taken 2' a disappointing rehash of the first

By PATRICK HALL
Special to the Wilson Post

With lines and situations pulled almost verbatim from its predecessor, the sequel to the surprising hit Taken (2008), aptly titled Taken 2 is disappointing, too familiar and an indicator of the current recipe in Hollywood: if it makes money the first time, just make a sequel.

Taken 2 picks up not long after retired CIA Agent Brian Mills (Liam Neeson) rescued his kidnapped daughter Kim (Maggie Grace) from Albanian human traffickers in the films predecessor. The first leap of faith is to believe Mills is still free to obsessively wash his car after the events in Taken that had him kill dozens of bad guys and cause mayhem all over Paris.

But, when Mills takes a job protecting a diplomat in Istanbul, Turkey, his ex-wife Lenore (Famke Jannsen) and Kim pay him a surprise visit for a vacation. Of course, the relatives of the guys Mills dispatched in the first installment come back for revenge, particularly, the father of one bad guy, who is actually never named in the film.

Read more...
Looper is smart, gritty and awesome

By PATRICK HALL
The Wilson Post

In 2044, an unnamed city in Kansas is ruled by the mob, filled with poor people in tent cities and zipping through this wasteland in fancy sports cars are brash, young assassins called Loopers, who work for the mob killing people sent to them from the future in the year 2074.

The film "Looper" focuses on the assassin Joe (Joseph Gordon-Levitt), who is billed as one of, if not the best at his job. In Joes world of 2044, time travel doesnt exist, but 30 years in the future it does, so mobsters pay Joe and his fellow Loopers to kill those who cross them and the Loopers live a seemingly wealthy life.

That is until someone starts closing the loops by sending the assassins their older-selves to kill, meaning Loopers have a 30-year shelf life. When the mob sends Joes older self (played by Bruce Willis) for execution, older Joe is ready and waiting. He outsmarts the younger Joe and goes on the run.

Read more...
Hoffman, Phoenix put on a mesmerizing show in Master

By PATRICK HALL
The Wilson Post

Like its two main characters, The Master is enigmatic and engaging, but its message is lost in the wake of two outstanding acting performances and provides more questions than answers.

Written and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson, Master is the story of World War II Naval veteran Freddie Quell (Joaquin Phoenix), an alcoholic drifter wandering the country following his discharge from the service, and intellectual cult leader Lancaster Dodd (Philip Seymour Hoffman), as they collide and their relationship fumbles through alongside the growth of Dodds cult movement The Cause.

First and foremost, Phoenix is phenomenal in his major acting return since his meltdown of a few years ago. Quell is an enigmatic disaster, destroying every situation he enters from a job as a department store photographer to a social outing with cult followers. His alcoholism shows no signs of soothing any pain but merely adds to his violent nature.

Hoffman delivers an extraordinary performance as Dodd, a.k.a. Master, who is jovial and charismatic, although when his cult is questioned, his anger always finds a way to briefly erupt. When he meets Quell, he sees him as the subject through which he can prove his theories.

Read more...
Avengers best movie of 2012 so far

By PATRICK HALL
The Wilson Post

Labor Day weekend is considered the end of the summer season for the film, and here is a look back and handing out some awards for this years movies that have come out so far, based on wholly subjective criteria.

Unfortunately, Im going to start with this years Worst Movie, which would be Battleship hands down, although Dark Shadows and Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter sure gave the board-game-based film a run for its money.

Directed by Peter Berg, Battleship is the story of some international sailors left to defend against an alien invasion. It is loud and there are explosions galore, but they arent exciting at all, which is a shame. For a film that tried to follow in the footsteps of Transformers it did succeed in being pretty awful, like most of those films.

Star Taylor Kitsch is uninteresting as are all the characters, save for Col. Gregory D. Gadson, a double amputee U.S. Army veteran who played double-amputee Lt. Col. Mick Canales. Out of all of this years movies coming out on DVD soon or already out, Id avoid Battleship at all costs.

Read more...
Bourne Legacy lacks what made previous three films special

By PATRICK HALL
The Wilson Post

Its never easy making a sequel, a storyline has to move forward and balance enough of what worked in the previous installment while delivering something new, but unfortunately, Bourne Legacy does neither.

Directed and co-written by Tony Gilroy and starring Jeremy Renner as government super-agent Aaron Cross, Legacy intertwines with events in 2007s Bourne Ultimatum, during which Jason Bourne (Matt Damon) finds closure and escapes his government tormentors.

Since the operations Treadstone and Blackbriar that spawned Bourne have been exposed, the Central Intelligence Agency is trying to cover its tracks by dispensing of other agents, including Cross. When they try to kill him, he goes on the run and action-movie stuff ensues.

Pulling the strings is Eric Byer played by Edward Norton, who we never really learn anything about, but is just like all the other baddies in the previous three films. He spouts platitudes about protecting America and the usual spy lingo.

Running with Cross is genetic scientist Dr. Marta Shearing (Rachel Weisz) who is the films most unique character and its most interesting.

Read more...
Lincoln, Master and Hobbit could be years most important films

By PATRICK HALL
The Wilson Post

Granted, there are still a few blockbusters to come this month and next, but arguably, the most important films of the year, in terms of awards and lasting impact, will be hitting theaters this winter.

Director Steven Spielbergs biopic on Abraham Lincoln entitled, Lincoln, is set to open Nov. 16 and has a pretty spectacular cast, including the greatest actor alive, Daniel Day-Lewis, in the roll of the 16th President.

Written by Tony Kushner and an original screenplay by Paul Webb, the film is based on Doris Kearns Goodwins biography Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln.

Its obviously unclear how much Spielberg will stick to the books themes, but given the fact weve had to put up with Abraham Lincoln Vampire Hunter this year, it will be nice to see the talented director take a serious look at one of our nations heroes.

With Day-Lewis leading the cast, his first film since he won an Oscar for Best Actor in 2007 (There Will Be Blood), you can bank on at least his otherworldly skill being the anchor of the film.

Read more...
"The Dark Knight Rises" is an outstanding end to Nolan's vision

By PATRICK HALL
The Wilson Post

Director and co-writerChristopherNolanconcludes his Batman trilogy with a finale that maybe falls short of masterpiece The Dark Knight but delivers such an outstanding conclusion, its only fault is being less-than perfect.

In The Dark Knight Rises, which picks up eight years after 2008s Dark Knight, Gotham City is without organized crime and believes Batman responsible for District Attorney Harvey Dents (AaronEckhart) death.

Thus Bruce Wayne (ChristianBale) is a recluse in his mansion, visibly incapable of adjusting to a life without Batman. Trouble brews as the unstoppable mercenary Bane (TomHardy) moves in with an elaborate plot to turn Gotham into a chaotic mob-rule society.

At almost 3 hours long, Rises begins with scenes that jump around introducing Bane, new gung-ho Gotham Police officer John Blake (JosephGordon-Levitt) the mysterious "cat burglar" Selina Kyle (AnneHathaway), businesswoman Miranda Tate (Marian Cotillard) and the usual suspects we already know: butler Alfred (Michael Cane) and Police Commissioner Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman).

Read more...
Nolans Batman trilogy poses ethical questions

{phocagallery view=category|categoryid=58|imageid=439|displayname=0|float=left}By PATRICK HALL
The Wilson Post

Friday marks the completion of director Christopher Nolans trilogy of Batman films with The Dark Knight Rises and his first two installments look at real world terrorism, the pursuit of bringing them to justice, and whether sacrificing an ethical code in the process is justifiable.

Since the start in 2005, with Batman Begins, Nolan has set Bruce Wayne/Batman (Christian Bale) against villains and their schemes that are reminiscent of real world terrorism.

Plots by villains in the films include bioterrorism in Begins to blowing up buildings, using suicide bombers and holding large passenger ferries hostage with bombs, in The Dark Knight.

Following 9/11, anthrax attacks killed five people and infected 22, terror suspects were arrested in Denver for attempting to poison water supplies and terrorists have been using suicide bombers and blowing up buildings for decades. Nolan's films ask the tough question of whether unethical means are allowable when hunting down such evil individuals.

Read more...
'Amazing Spider-Man is familiar, yet pleasantly new

{phocagallery view=category|categoryid=58|imageid=370|displayname=0|float=left}By PATRICK HALL
The Wilson Post

Perhaps its too early for a reboot of the Spider-Man franchise, which Sony began in 2002 with Spider-Man, but the restart with The Amazing Spider-Man features a side of Peter Parker thats welcome and more interesting, making his web-slinging hero side, that much more powerful.

Sony went back to square-one with Amazing, starting with Peter Parker, played by Andrew Garfield, watching his scientist father and his mother leave unexpectedly. Peter grows up with his Aunt May (Sally Field) and Uncle Ben (Martin Sheen).

Peter meets a scientist, Dr. Curt Connors (Rhys Ifans), who worked with Peters father Richard on cross-genetic research. He also develops a friendship and love interest in Gwen Stacy, played by Emma Stone.

But when Connors uses a revolutionary serum that he and Peter co-create to repair his amputated right arm, using reptile DNA, the good doctor turns into a misguided monster, The Lizard.

The film separates itself well from the previous trilogy, showing a more troubled Peter Parker than before. While Tobey Maguires Parker was smitten by his love interest, he isnt necessarily displayed as a teen struggling with the obvious issues that would come along from losing his parents so early.

Read more...
Displaying Articles 1 - 25 of 40
Prev - Next
Powered by Bondware
News Publishing Software